Stay STI Smart is a game developed by Youth Wellbeing Project. This game requires a Spin Board, Dice and tokens: available for purchase in our store.

Learning builds on, but is not limited to, prior sexual health knowledge. Due to the vast number of STIs, only some are highlighted. An important supporting information document is provided in the STIs: Facts, Prevention, Outcomes resource, found online in the Delivery Stream

Resources:
– Stay STI Fact File (this webpage)
4 Markers (A, B, C, Other)

– 1 Giant Foam dice
– 1 Stay STI smart Spin Board
– Tokens

Rules:

  • Ask the participants to stand in the middle of the room with the 4 Markers laid out in in the remaining floor space.
  • Participants are issued 3 ‘life-lines’ – Tokens – worth 1 point each
  • Ask one participant to roll the dice and another to use the Spin Board. The number on the dice and colour randomly selected relates to the question. If you have already read a particular question, move on to another of the same colour.
  • The facilitator asks the question selected, prompting the participants to stand around the marker they think is the right answer.
  • Participants who are standing on the right answer receive ONE point.
  • If they are on the wrong answer, ONE point is deducted.
  • If it is an “OTHER” answer and they have partially answered by standing on one of the correct options, they do not receive nor have points deducted.
  • If questions arise for further investigation, write it on the board.
  • Continue to have different participants roll the dice and use the Spin Board so each player gets a turn.
  • Optional prizes for participant(s) who score the most points.

1.  Why is a self-examination of the testes (balls) important?
A – Because it feels good
B – To check they have not disappeared
C – To check for testicular cancer
Other

Answer: C
Check for testicular cancer. Regular once a month checks should begin at about the age of 15. If changes in size, a lump, pain or tenderness is found, go to the doctor straight away. It is normal to have one testis which is larger than the other. Cancer of the testes is not common and treatment is very successful. It is more common in boys or men who had an undescended testis (ie. the testes had not descended into the scrotum, and needed to be operated on to bring it/them down).

2.  What is a Pap Smear?
A – An injection
B – A collection of cells
C – A blood test
Other

Answer: B
A pap smear is a simple procedure to collect cells from the woman’s cervix which are then placed onto a slide (smear). The slide is sent to a laboratory – if abnormal changes are found, further tests will be done to see if treatment is needed. A pap smear is a screening tool to find early warning signs that cancer might develop in the future. The procedure only takes a few minutes. No drugs or anaesthetics are required and it can be done by a general practitioner, nurse or women’s health worker. The pap smear is not for diagnosing cancers, STIs or any other problems in the reproductive system. They require different tests. STI checks are available from your GP.

3. How is a self-examination of the testes (balls) carried out?
A – Ask for someone to help
B – Squeeze them really hard
C – Stand in front of a mirror after a warm shower
Other

Answer: C
Stand in front a mirror after a warm shower. Heat helps the testes hang lower so they are easier to feel and find anything different. A mirror helps you see any swelling of the skin around the testes. Feel each testicle with both hands. Both the index and middle fingers should be placed under the testicle while the thumbs are placed on the top. Gently roll the testicle between the thumbs and fingers. Locate the epididymis (soft tube-like structure at the back of the testicle that collects and carries the sperm). This should not be mistaken for an abnormal lump.

4. When should a woman get a Pap Smear?
A – Every 2 months after sexual activity commences
B – Every 2 years if sexually active and over the age of 18
C – Every 3 years after sexual activity commences
Other

Answer: B
All women over the age of 18 who have ever had sex are advised to have a Pap smear every 2 years (even if they have stopped having sex). A GP may recommend more frequent pap smears if a previous smear showed significant cell changes or if problems are experienced, such as bleeding or pain after sex. Women vaccinated with GARDISIL will still be at risk from other high-risk HPV genotypes, so it’s important to continue routine cervical cancer screening (Pap Smears).

5. How can you be sure that you do not have an STI?
A – Use condoms
B – No sores or pus
C – Get Tested
Other

Answer: C
Get tested. It is the only way to know whether you do or don’t have an STI. Some STIs cause symptoms. Others don’t. You could have one and not know it. Some make you sick today others cause problems later in life and some are with you for life.

6. A dental dam is…
A – A body of water dentists go sailing on
B – Useful for storing dentures (false teeth) at night
C – A thin piece of rubber
Other

Answer: C
A dental dam is a thin square of latex rubber that is placed over the vagina or anal area during oral sex and can be used to provide a barrier between the body fluids.

1.  How many different types of STIs were there in the 60’s?
A – Less than 10
B – Less than 20
C – Less than 50
Other

Answer: A
In the 60’s there were only two STIs which were common and of concern – gonorrhoea and syphilis – both treatable. Around 1 in 50 adolescents were infected. Today, if a person is sexually active they have a 1 in 8 chance of getting an STI. There are over 25 different STIs caused by bacteria, viruses and parasites.

2.  How is an STI transferred?
A – From one infected person to another through sexual intercourse
B – From mother to child during pregnancy and childbirth
C – Through the sharing of blood products or tissue transfers
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – This includes oral and anal sex. Some STIs are transferred on skin to skin contact. Because there may be no symptoms, people don’t know they have the infection. Getting tested is really important.

3. The STIs which will be with a person for the rest of their lives are?
A – Bacterial STIs
B – Ectoparasitic Infections
C – Viral STIs
Other

Answer: C
A virus is able to reproduce itself. Once infected, a person will always carry the virus. Some medications will reduce the symptoms; however none of the viral STIs can be cured. A Bacterial STI is usually treated with antibiotics. An Ectoparasitic Infection is caused by parasites which live on the skins surface. For example, pubic lice and scabies.

4. Bacterial STIs Gonorrhoea and chlamydia are becoming Super bugs…
A – True
B – False
C – If mixed with steroids
Other

Answer: A
True. Bacterial STIs: Gonorrhoea and chlamydia are becoming drug resistant (Super bugs). Retesting 3 months after antibiotic treatment is highly recommended.

5.  If you are diagnosed with an STI what is the next step?
A – Inform all sexual partners from the past 6 months
B – Hope that it will go away
C – Have a longer shower
Other

Answer: A
Inform all sexual partners from at least the past 6 months so they may be tested and treated if necessary.
For more advice and assistance with partner notification you can go to bettertoknow.org.au/notify/sms

6.  Oral Sex is…
A – Enjoyable
B – Risky
C – Foreplay
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – Many people enjoy oral sex as a part of their sexual activity. However it is also a very risky activity. STIs can be transmitted through oral sex with an infected partner, including: genital herpes, syphilis, gonorrhoea, chancroid, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), intestinal parasites, HIV and Hepatitis A. You must get tested if you’ve been sexually active, even if you have no symptoms.

1. A person can get genital herpes (HSV-2) from a person with a cold sore on their mouth (HSV-1)…
A – True
B – False
C – Only if they’ve been eating chocolate
Other

Answer: A
True. A person can become infected with HSV-2 on their genitals if they receive oral sex from a person with HSV-1 on their lip. HSV is highly contagious even when not visible. Although HSV-1 prefers the mouth and lips and HSV-2 prefers the genitals, both can affect both sites (although the symptoms may not be as severe). Also recurring outbreaks can be triggered by things like fatigue, stress and low self-esteem.

2. How can syphilis be contracted?
A – Contact with sores
B – Vaginal or oral sex
C – Skin to skin contact
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – Syphilis can be contracted through contact with sores or infected patches by having oral sex or skin to skin contact. A condom will only provide protection if it covers the infected area.

3. The leading cause of oral and throat cancer is…
A – Smoking
B – HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)
C – Loud Singing
Other

Answer: B
The leading cause of oral and throat cancer is no longer cigarette smoking but HPV. 70% of all new cases are linked to HPV. Those who have given oral sex 6 or more times are at greatest risk with men also at high risk for the disease.

Answer: OTHER
4. Condoms are most effective against?
A – Unplanned pregnancy
B – HIV
C – Other STIs
Other

Answer: OTHER

Condoms are most effective against unplanned pregnancy and the transmission of HIV if used consistently and correctly. Latex condoms reduce the risk of transmission of STIs such as gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. Consistent and correct use of latex condoms reduces the risk of genital herpes, HPV, syphilis and cancroid ONLY when the infected area is covered by the condom. The only way to be 100% protected is to avoid all sexual activity or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner.

5. Females are more biologically at risk for developing an STI…
A – True
B – False
C – If they sleep around
Other

Answer: A
True. Females are more biologically at risk of developing an STI. Also the cervix (neck of the womb) of young females is more vulnerable to certain STIs than older females.

Other high risk factors include:
• Lack of barrier contraception (for example, condoms)
• Indigenous populations
• Recent change of sexual partners
• Multiple partners

6. Drinking alcohol often increases the risk of getting an STI
A – True
B – False
C – Only if a person engages in oral sex
Other

Answer: A
True. Engaging in sexual activity whilst under the influence of alcohol often increases the risk of getting an STI. A person who has been drinking is more likely to participate in high-risk sexual activities such as:
• Not using barrier contraception like condoms
• Engaging in oral sex without a condom
• Having multiple sex partners
• Engaging in sexual activity with a partner with an unknown STI history

1. HSV (Herpes Simplex Virus) is a curable disease…
A – True
B – False
C – Depends on the person
Other

Answer: B
False. Genital herpes cannot be cured. Once you have the herpes virus, you always have herpes. There is no cure. Some medicines or creams may reduce your symptoms.

2. How many ‘ Genotypes’ of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are there?
A – 10
B – 50
C – Over 100
Other

Answer: C
There are over 100 HPV ‘Genotypes’, identifiable numerically. Most genital infections with HPV do not cause any symptoms and people often don’t know they have the infection.

3.  What does HIV stand for?
A – Human Immune Vaccine
B – Human Immunodeficiency Virus
C – Human Interference Virus
Other

Answer: B
HIV is a virus (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) which invades the immune system and slowly destroys it. This reduces the body’s ability to fight off infections and cancer. Without treatment, people with HIV develop AIDS (Acquired Immune Defficiency Syndrome), which can be fatal. It is important to remember that a person who has HIV can pass on the virus immediately after becoming infected, even if they feel healthy. It’s not possible to tell just by looking at someone if they have been infected with HIV. The only way to know for certain if someone is infected with HIV is to be tested.

4.  Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) can be transferred by?
A – Kissing
B – Skin to skin contact
C – Sexual activity such as vaginal, oral and anal sex
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – HSV can be passed on by kissing or other skin to skin sexual activities. More than 1 in 10 Australians carry the virus responsible for Genital Herpes. Pregnant mums can pass on genital herpes (HSV-2) to their baby in utero or directly following child birth.

5.  What does HPV (Human Papillomavirus) cause?
A – A Rash
B – Warts
C – Blistering
Other

Answer: B
Some people develop genital warts – around 10% of cases have warts as a symptom. Some HPV “genotypes” cause warts on hands and feet. Penetration is not required to contract HPV – you can get it from skin to skin contact. Babies can get it from their mothers during childbirth.

6.  Who is at risk of the HIV infection?
A – Men
B – Young people
C – Anyone who is sexually active with an infected person
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – HIV is not a gay or straight or a male or female disease. HIV is a human disease. In 2009, over ¼ Diagnosed were heterosexual. The number of heterosexual men and women with HIV infection and AIDS has been increasing worldwide. Stereotypes associated with HIV/AIDS can prevent women, and their health care providers, from seeing themselves at risk for HIV infection.

1. What is the most commonly transmitted Bacterial STI?
A – Syphilis
B – Chlamydia
C – Gonorrhoea
Other

Answer: B
80% of reported cases of chlamydia are in 15-29 year old’s. Chlamydia rates have quadrupled in the last decade, mainly among young people.  Because the infection usually doesn’t cause symptoms and many people remain untested, numbers may be even higher. Chlamydia is transmitted through vaginal, anal and oral sex. It may also be transmitted from:
• The genitals to the eye; or
• From a woman to her baby during delivery, causing serious eye and lung infections.

2. What are the outcomes of syphilis?
A – Ulcers and sores
B – Brain Damage
C – Heart Failure
Other

Answer: OTHER
All of the above. At first, it causes sores or ulcers on the genitals. Sometimes these may be internal and go unnoticed – for example, on a woman’s cervix. If it is not treated, the infection then spreads through the body and may infect the brain and other organs.  It has serious long term effects. Antibiotics will not repair any damage already done, however early detection and antibiotic treatment will clear this infection.

3.  Gonorrhoea can infect the throat…
A – True
B – False
C – Only if you have tonsils
Other

Answer: A – True
Gonorrhoea can infect the throat and can be transmitted during an act of oral sex. It is very important to use protection when having oral sex – if you put your mouth in contact with any area of your partners genitals or anus, you must use a condom or a dental dam.

4. If a person is infected with chlamydia they can have:
A – Burning during urination or cervical bleeding
B – Pain during sexual intercourse
C – No symptoms
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – Chlamydia is known as a “silent” disease because about three quarters of infected women and about half of infected men have no symptoms. Chlamydia can also be found in the throats of women and men having oral sex with an infected partner. If left undiagnosed, serious complications can cause irreversible damage, including infertility (the ability to have kids in the future) from Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (in women) or Epididymitis (in men).

5. If treated with antibiotics for Chlamydia (a bacterial STI):
A – It will never come back
B – A person may be re-infected
C – Condoms don’t matter anymore
Other

Answer: B
One fifth of young women are re-infected with Chlamydia within 12 months. Reinfections double the chance of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID). It is important to get retested (usually 3 months after treatment).

6.  What are the symptoms of Gonorrhoea?
A – Pain when urinating
B – Pus and discharge from the genitals
C – No symptoms
Other

Answer: OTHER
More Than One – Most people have no symptoms. Or symptoms could be: Pain when going to the bathroom, “discharge” coming from the penis or vagina, abdominal pain (females). Gonorrhoea also causes pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and epididymitis (damage to the reproductive organs). Untreated infection can damage your joints, heart or brain. Gonorrhoea also increases the risk of getting HIV.